What's Cahors? Where is it?

Cahors

 

 

The most common commentary on this appellation, found in the South West of France, is that its red wines have been dubbed “black wine” for their opaque, dark purple hue. That myth has largelybeen exploded with modern approaches to winemaking producing much lighter colored but just as flavorful wines. Cahors red wine must be made from a minimum of 70% Malbec (AKA Auxerrois here) with merlot and Tannat in supporting roles, all coming together to provide a richness of plums and dried fruit, both in the nose and flavor of the wine, a full body, and a good measure of tannins. The lighter styles generally come from grapes grown on the limestone plateau and can be enjoyed with in a few years. The fuller, more traditional styles get their complexity and depth of flavor from the gravel ridges formed with in the bends of the river Lot, or from the limestone foothills, and can improve over decades.

Cahors is the park purple region in the middle of the map, see how it is almost parallel to Bordeaux. 

Cahors is the park purple region in the middle of the map, see how it is almost parallel to Bordeaux. 

Ryan McWilliams